Lump

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Lump

Postby Cariboo » Tue Feb 15, 2005 5:14 pm

Lucky has developed a small lump on the back of his neck where he recently (Feb 2) got his rabbies and distemper vaccinations. The lump is about an inch in diameter, and it doesn't seem to hurt him if you squeeze it a little. I've just noticed it today, and have called the vet. They said that while it isn't common, it's not unusual. So we might be taking Luckster in for an exam in a couple days. I'm just wondering if the lump is from an allergic reaction, a fatty deposite (which I'm seriously doubting), or something worse (like maybe a tumor :shock: )?
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Postby Barb Wright » Tue Feb 15, 2005 6:55 pm

It could very well be an adverse reaction to a vaccination...it is not as unusual as you might think :evil: If your vet confirms that it is at the site of the vaccination you should immediately file an "adverse drug event" report with the FDA, contact the pharmaceutical company involved, and don't let up until they pay your vet bills for any medical attention required to take care of the lump.

Tumors (and other equally dreadful manifestations) caused by vaccinations and so-called "preventatives", and the medical bills that ensue to try to resolve the occurance, are ethically the financial responsibility of the pharmaceutical company.....that being said, you have to be very stubborn about pursuing them for reconciliation :x Hopefully your vet is militant enough to assist you and not let them (the big pharms) blow you off :!:

That being said, let's hope it is just a minor problem and merely coincidental.....personally, I am not a big believer in "coincidence" in cases like this :!: My less than humble opinion :evil:
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Postby Cariboo » Tue Feb 15, 2005 7:32 pm

Thanks, so much, Barb! That was really helpful; I didn't even know to make the pharmaceutical company foot the bills! 8) Anyways, what did you mean by:

That being said, let's hope it is just a minor problem and merely coincidental.....personally, I am not a big believer in "coincidence" in cases like this
?

Also, if it is a minor problem, should we have it removed...or just leave it there?
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Postby Dave » Tue Feb 15, 2005 7:52 pm

Hi, I would tend to think the lump is a reaction to the injection site . I believe it should be watched , but should disipate on it's own .It's like when kids got the bump from vacinations :shock: JMHO .Let us know how it turns out and give him a big pet for me . 8) Dave
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Postby Cariboo » Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:14 pm

Dave, I thought of that too. I know that my friend used to get bumps on her arm where she got her allergy shot, but I don't know if that situation applies here. :? Would be a great relief if it went away itself. It's kinda strang that I just noticed this lump cuz I make it a daily routine to check Lucky for these sort of things (usually by massaging him, that lucky duck! :lol: ). I must have missed it , because it wouldn't form so late after the vaccines, would it?

Thanks for the help :)
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Postby Myra » Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:24 pm

I agree with Dave. Lumps like that from vaccines or other types of injections usually go away in a couple of weeks or so, no treatment required.
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Postby Barb Wright » Tue Feb 15, 2005 11:09 pm

I agree, let's all think positive :) but do not cease vigilance :!: Sarcomas (cancerous tumors) are not a "rare" occurance at injection sites. Just be very diligent about keeping a close eye on this.

And while we are on the subject :roll: there are adjuvant free Rabies shots now available, at least for cats :? I wonder what prompted that :?: Could it be that so many cats were getting cancerous lumps at injection sites :?: Makes one wonder :!: (Not me...I am 100% convinced about the real dangers involved with "prevention" medications/vaccinations :evil:

Another thing to ask of your vet.....how about a thimerasol (mercury) free Rabies vaccination :?: That is available too...and so it should be....mercury is linked to neurological "problems", including seizures and aggression. Just thought I would throw that in for a little food for thought :shock:
Last edited by Barb Wright on Wed Feb 16, 2005 2:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Karen_P » Tue Feb 15, 2005 11:38 pm

Barb, you're absolutely right. I lost a cat to vaccine site sarcoma about 7 yrs ago.

But, on a high note, Courage gets a huge lump each time he gets a rabies vaccine, and although it takes a while to go away (weeks), it does go away.
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Postby Barb Wright » Wed Feb 16, 2005 12:32 pm

Cariboo wrote: Anyways, what did you mean by:

That being said, let's hope it is just a minor problem and merely coincidental.....personally, I am not a big believer in "coincidence" in cases like this
?

Also, if it is a minor problem, should we have it removed...or just leave it there?


Cariboo....sorry, got carried away and didn't answer your questions :oops: As for "coincidence"....IMO a disease occuring at an injection site is caused by the injection of whatever. I was just putting a "hopeful" spin on this situation by saying "merely coincidental".

As to the removal....that is something that you and your vet will need to decide. It definitely depends upon just what the lump turns out to be. Your vet should have the best and proper advice.

Keep us posted on how it all goes....we all learn from each and every individual event :)
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Postby Cariboo » Wed Feb 16, 2005 4:26 pm

OK, I've decided to monitor the lump and see if it grows or stays the same. If it does grow, then it's definnately time to rush to the vet :shock: . Hopefully it will go down and everyone will be happy :wink: .

However, this raises a question for me: Are vaccinations not really good to have annually? Should we start the 3-year rabies vaccine with Lucky as opposed to staying on the annual rabies vaccine?

Thanks for all the input, this has really helped :D
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Postby Janice » Wed Feb 16, 2005 4:41 pm

Speaking of sarcomas at injection sites, my vet said that there was an article in the veterinary journals recently saying that on cats the injection site should be moved to the leg muscles instead of between the shoulder blade. That way should a sarcoma occur as a result of vaccines, it could more easily be removed.

So there you go folks, they aware that vaccines can cause cancer. Personally, I try not to over do it.
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Postby Karen_P » Wed Feb 16, 2005 6:12 pm

The frequency of rabies vaccines are dictated by your state laws. Here in NJ the first 2 shots are given a year apart, then every 3 years thereafter. When I lived in FL, the law stated the dogs had to be vaccinated annually.
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Postby Barb Wright » Wed Feb 16, 2005 6:45 pm

Janice wrote:..... That way should a sarcoma occur as a result of vaccines, it could more easily be removed.


Does the fact that a vet would say that bother anyone else besides me :shock: :?: Keep giving a vaccine even though it causes cancer, a killing cancer, at the injection site :shock: Just do it somewhere else on the body so the cancer is easier to get at :shock: I am totally horrifed by this kind of thinking :evil: There is something dreadfully wrong with this kind of medical philosophy :evil:

Moving on to the other question (before I get into a rant)....quite a few States, most Veterinary Colleges, and Veterinary teaching hospitals, and many veterinarians are coming around to changing their recommended protocol for the rabies vaccine. The 3 year is becoming acceptable. Seeing as only a healthy dog should be vaccinated, in some states a waiver is allowed if a blood titer shows the appropriate antibody level to the Rabies virus. It will be a while before this becomes acceptable in all states...you will have to investigate your own state to see where they stand.

Interestingly enough, it is not the rabies itself that is causing so many problems with dogs and cats, as it is the adjuvants used in the preserving and dispersal activity of the germs to make the immune system resistant to the disease. Mercury, pig/monkey/chicken cells, other toxic chemicals contained in the final product, these are the things that are raising such havoc. There are rabies vaccines available now that are mercury and adjuvant free, you just have to ask for them in particular....and probably pay more for the "purer" form of course :evil:

This is pretty much what I have garnered from reading in the last few months....there may be later information than this. In a perfect world (Ha, that will be the day) your vet should be up to date on all this...if not, use the web, there is continual upgrading on research and studies about this very subject.

It behooves us to try to stay current on all this as best we can, after all, no one cares more for our animals than we ourselves do :!:
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Postby Janice » Wed Feb 16, 2005 7:49 pm

Karen, fortunatly we now have a three year vaccine for Rabies here in florida. However with my last dog who would never have the chance to meet up with any wild animals here in the city, I just quit giving him rabies vaccines when he turned 5 years. When his license expired and I was notified by the county that it must be renewed, I just checked the box that he was deceased and put an end to the rabies merry-go-round. Of course I did have to watch him to make sure he never came into contact to bite anyone, which was highly unlikely anyhow. My vet never said a word to pressure me into getting the vaccine. I'm sure he realized five years was quite enough to last a lifetime.

To Barb, or anyone else who may know, is there any difference in the one year or three year vaccine? I asked my vet, but because the three year being so new he didn't have an answer for me. I was just curious.

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Postby Myra » Wed Feb 16, 2005 8:33 pm

My understanding is that the the vaccine is exactly the same, it's just that some states require that it be given every year and other states only require it every three years. Here in NC for as long as I can remember it has only been required every three years.

The county that I live in has had a major rabies epidemic among the wildlife population for several years, to the extent that it's not something I would consider skipping. It's so bad that a couple of years ago our county instituted a $100 a day fine for any dog or cat overdue for it's rabies vaccine. Although I'm not sure how they go about enforcing that . . . :?

Vaccine-related cancers are much, much more common in cats than in dogs. The feline leukemia vaccine is especially troublesome, and most vets don't recommend it for cats who are totally indoors and so at very low risk of contracting it. And some vets now give vaccines to cats in their tails, since that's even "easier" to amputate than a leg.
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