Range...Is it in the genes?

For all Brittany hunting/field trial discussion.

Moderators: Barb Wright, Lisa

Postby Catharina » Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:26 am

I had to think of this thread this morning and yesterday -- Kibo and I were on a walk in the woods with several people and SEVEN other dogs of various breeds and ages. Guess who was the only dog that couldn't happily mosey along the trail or close to it :?:

Right, got it in one. He was good about coming back to the whistle each time, but as for staying within my sightline - nope, not Mr. Flies-Through-The-Woods-Like-A-Demon. Darn Brittany genes.
Image

Kibo, a.k.a. "The Flying Nose"
Catharina
Master Hunter
Master Hunter
 
Posts: 827
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 8:02 am
Location: NW Pennsylvania

Postby adele » Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:24 am

Oh ya, its in the genes. I met a man who asked me where I got my Britt. I told him the breeder's name and he said "Oh his dogs really range far". No kidding, that's what he said. So, I gather that not only is it normal for Britts to range but MY Britt comes from stock renowned for their ranging behavior. Double whammy.

Also, when I was researching the breeder, I phoned some people who had bought dogs from him. One woman said that her dog took off once too often and her husband had to take over the training. She said that their other Britt, from another breeder, didn't run away like that. (She also said the dogs were healthy so, in my arrogance, I figured I could train my dog and all that mattered was that the line was healthy. HaHaHa joke is on me.)

Oh well look on the bright side, this way we can blame genetics, "Its not my fault, she has bad genes".
Image
adele
Field Trial Champion
Field Trial Champion
 
Posts: 2726
Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2005 7:12 am

Postby Catharina » Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:34 am

I have read in several places that the "range" of a hunting dog is genetically hard-wired. I'd be interested to hear if people on this forum think this is true, too.

Barb, should we start a thread on "field trials" for this, or will the right folks read it here?
Image

Kibo, a.k.a. "The Flying Nose"
Catharina
Master Hunter
Master Hunter
 
Posts: 827
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 8:02 am
Location: NW Pennsylvania

Postby Barb Wright » Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:06 pm

Voila!!! Here we are in Hunting/Field Trials :lol: :lol:

FWIW Cassie ranges close for the most part, within 1-200 yds, if that is considered "close" :? I think it is close enough because I can yell at least that far if the wind is right :wink: Her breeder did not hunt, show only, so don't know what she is hard-wired for.....except she has automatic ear disconnect when she is in hunt mode :wink:
RIP Sweet Cassie 4/98 - 3/13
Barb Wright
The Grammar Police
The Grammar Police
 
Posts: 6761
Joined: Wed May 12, 2004 12:45 pm
Location: Idaho

Postby Cindy » Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:32 pm

Looks like we have one of each. Kayla tends to stay fairly close (100-200 yards), does alot of running around us in a large circle (she could be part herding dog), always comes immediately when called and tends to check in if she's been gone for a while and we don't call her.

Jill seems to have a HUGE range. When we let her off leash she always runs straight ahead and can be out of sight and ear shot in seconds!!! We've been working on this ALOT lately and just this morning started to have some reliable success. But never fear - just as the walk/run was getting near the end she took off and didn't come back for 5 minutes!! She's still a Britt!! But the good part with Jill is that she ALWAYS comes back, even if it's on her own terms. It may take her a while but I never worry that she won't return. Of course this is OK where we live but I'd never let her go in unfamiliar territory without keeping her very close. And fortunately she will stya close but it requires constant verbal commands. A work in progress for sure! :)

I wonder if it has anything to do with their color. Both of the liver and white dogs we've had stayed close and both of the orange and wide ones had wide ranges. Interesting ....
Last edited by Cindy on Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Kayla RIP 10/2/15, Pippa, and Layla
[url]Image[/url]
Cindy
Dual Champion
Dual Champion
 
Posts: 5670
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 4:26 pm
Location: Virginia

Postby Dave » Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:34 pm

Big Running Brittanys seem to be very popular among field trial people . I prefer a short ranging dog if I'm hunting . I almost bought a trained gun dog yesterday . Her trainer said she stays way too close . I was watching his big ranging dogs and thinking the only way I'd get to that dog before he fell asleep on point would be on an ATV :roll: :wink: I then thought , If I had my 22-250 and bi-pod I could shoot the bird from 400 yards :P :lol: Dave
If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.
-Will Rogers
Dave
Field Trial Champion
Field Trial Champion
 
Posts: 4459
Joined: Wed Jun 23, 2004 11:25 pm
Location: Montana

Postby CJ » Mon Jan 14, 2008 4:02 pm

I'd say mostly genetics, but training, exposure, and social skills have a lot to do with if/how those genetics play out. A pup out of big running all age blood lines can/will shorten up if it's had a rough start to life and then is gets reigned in constantly by its owner/trainer. Also, if they are only ever hunted on close in quary, they will tend to be close company as well. Soo... even if they are "wired" to range, a lot can effect that wiring after the fact.
Image
CJ
Master Hunter
Master Hunter
 
Posts: 606
Joined: Wed May 19, 2004 10:59 am
Location: Utard (Very south eastern Idaho)

Postby Jacksbuddy » Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:13 pm

I think it is KarenP who has always said, "check the bloodline/it's in the breeding".
Dave I have a dog that comes from a long ranging line that has grown into a beautiful gun dog.
Image

"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog."
- Edward Hoagland
Jacksbuddy
Field Trial Champion
Field Trial Champion
 
Posts: 1334
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2005 9:29 am
Location: Lancaster Co. PA

Postby Karen_P » Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:58 pm

The old saying goes "you can bring a dog in, but you can't push them out", and this is mostly true in my opinion.

A proficient trainer can absolutely push a dog's range to some extent, but they're not going to be able to take a hard-core boot licker and turn it into an all age dog. Things like overhandling and heavy-handed corrections can make a dog overly dependent on his/her handler, and therefore shorten it's range considerably.

But yes, in my opinion a dog's natural range is 80% genetics, 20% luck (maybe 70/30) :D
Image
Home of DC Britt Haven's Blaze of Glory
http://www.woodlandbrittanys.com
Karen_P
Field Trial Champion
Field Trial Champion
 
Posts: 1792
Joined: Wed May 12, 2004 5:43 pm
Location: New Jersey


Return to Hunting/Field Trials

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron