Holly settled in and acting like a pup

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Dave
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Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by Dave »

Two weeks ago, I was out of town so my family ordered a pizza and while the door was open, Holly bolted after a rabbit. Needless to say, it took 50 minutes and the help of several neighbors to finally catch her. While in Fernie, I took her to a ball diamond that was completely fenced and let her loose. Again, she was intent on escape and I finally had to lunge for her collar and with the other arm around her, she completely flipped me into the snow. I successfully hung on and only have a bruised cheek bone where her head hit me but at least I still have a dog. She will come in the house but can't be trusted outside at all.

We have gone back to square one in terms of leash walking because of her continuing to pull. The cat issue remains unresolved although we have had no injuries to either dog or cats. I know that 7-9 months is a difficult time but even though the professional trainer was very impressed with our relationship with her, she was of little constructive help other than just keep working with her.

What would you suggest? Jan
I suggested ecollar training for recall . Others please chime in . Thanks Dave
If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.
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LauraV
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by LauraV »

I second the ecollar. We swear by ours! Our girl pretends she doesn't even know us when we are outside unless it is on. And just because she's trained with the ecollar doesn't mean we use it. Infact the remote has been missing for a week, but she hasn't figured that out yet!
Some dogs just aren't motivated anything but an ecollar outside!
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britlover
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by britlover »

Another vote for the eCollar. I almost never have to nic the dog after a week of training, even though he is extremely prey driven. I have a Tritronics that is waterproof so I can use it at the beach too. Well worth the expense so I can enjoy watching my young guy run up and down the beach chasing the birds, knowing that I'm in control if he wanders too far.

janet909
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by janet909 »

I was probably the most hesitant person in the world to put an ecollar on a dog (especially a sensative Brittany) but, yes, some dogs only listen this way. For us, wanting to run with the dogs off leash, it's the only way to ensure that they won't follow their noses into the next state. I am ecollar training with the use of a whistle so that my new dog can range but still hear my whistle from a distance. He responds almost flawlessly and after 4 sessions with the ecollar, I'm rarely using it as the whistle gets his attention first. I've ordered one with the new vibration mode. We originally got the collar for hunting at the nearby bird club with our older Britt. If we missed a bird, he'd follow it into the next field that might have 4 guys shooting !!!! It was for his safety !!!

swillow66
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by swillow66 »

Sorry to disagree, but I would NOT recommend an ecollar until you can get a solid trained "come"

If you have not check out this webiste you should!
http://brittanys.com
http://brittanys.com/Brittany_training.htm
Teaching the dog to come to you when called, Several methods

Method 1. We teach the dog his/her name through repetition and rewards. When pup is young, we work on it everyday for just a few minutes from a six-foot lead until he comes immediately. We call the pup like this " Fido, Come". If he does not come to you, gently 'check' him and repeat the command simultaneously. When he comes, praise - reward. Once he is doing it without having to check him, then move to a 20 to 30 feet long check cord and repeat as above. (All initial training is done in an enclosed yard for safety reasons). We praise a lot every time pup comes (even if it's slowly) and about every 2nd or 3rd time we'll give pup a small tasty treat as an additional reward. This really keeps pup sharp and looking for praise/rewards. Remember to check pup with the leash/check cord upward and command "come" when he ignores you, then immediately call him in an easy tone and pull him to you. Praise excitedly and reward when he arrives. Repeat. Keep lessons short-10 minutes. Do this daily.

When he does this without fail, let him drag the check cord on your outdoor jaunts. If he fails to come when called, run him down (never call him more than once if you're sure he heard his name/command to come). It's best to use a 30-foot plus check cord for this and be sure to tie a big knot in the very end (the free end). That way you can just simply run up on him, step on the cord and the knot will catch on your foot which allows you time to pick it up and reel him in. Do not praise if you had to run pup down. Take pup to the location from which you originally called him. Release pup again and repeat if necessary. Pup must be coming to you reliably while dragging the check cord before you allow him to run free.

Praise excitedly when he does it correctly, offer a small treat and quit training, then just play for a few minutes without asking him to do anything. Even if he does it right within 3 minutes. Never train longer than about 10 minutes per session. Allow at least a 2 or 3 hours between sessions and never more than about 3 sessions in one day

Method 2. Another way is for two people to sit on the ground about 3 feet apart. A first person calls pups name and immediately gives a small tasty reward. Then the opposite person does the same. Over a period of days and a couple of weeks, we increase the distance between the two people. If done correctly and not rushing, pup will run as fast as he can to get to the
person who called him, even the length of a football field (which is a good place to work on the greater distances by the way).

Method 3. Here's one that works well if you can find some safe acreage to take your dog to:

Release the dog as you normally do, when the dog disappears or is reluctant to return, never repeat the command if you're sure he heard it. Simply sit down in some good cover (when the dog is out of sight or not responding) but don't let the dog see where you are. Sit quietly and say nothing. Depending on the dog, a bit of time will go by and he will realize you are no longer there. He looks fast and furious for you, maybe passing within feet of you. Soon he panics. Let him panic for a minute or two (panic symptoms include whining, howling, running in no specific direction, trying to look harder for you, etc.) When he is good and worried, Stand up and call him. Say it only one time. If he's good and scared, he'll run right to you. PRAISE, PRAISE, and REWARD with a treat.

O.K., Here are a couple more suggestions:

Another trick is to plant a couple pigeons in hidden launchers about 50 to 75 yards apart (assuming he is pointing, remote controlled launchers if not). On a long check cord, let him run to the end and lead him _away_ but near the first bird. Then call him to come with you towards the hidden bird (into the downwind scent cone). If he disobeys, simply reel him in and take him into the scent cone. He will point/flush (depending on training), you fire the blank gun/kill the bird if he points it. If he's not pointing yet, simply let him see the flushing bird and get excited, then off to the next bird to repeat. Do this a couple times the same way and soon he will worship you as the almighty BIRD GOD and will come with you whenever you ask. This is a good alternative way to teach quartering or the 'birds in here' command.

O.K. one more note about coming to the name. We teach our dogs to come to a special command other than his/her name. Example: "Chief, here" or "Chief, come". Why? Because a house companion that you love gets talked about a lot. You know casual conversation where you are saying your dogs' name over and over when you are not really calling him/her to you. Example: "Well you should have seen Chief this morning. Chief wanted to play and I didn't. But Chief persisted and he..........." You get the point, right? Soon, your pet becomes tone deaf to his own name because half of the time that you speak his name you're not really calling him.

We use the the dogs name as an attention getter to be followed by a command. I guess I learned this in my military marching drills. You have the 'preparatory command' followed by the 'command of execution'. So the preparatory command is 'Chief' and the command of execution is 'come' or 'heel' or whatever. It really works and you must be consistent.

Our recommendation is to not use his name in front of him when engaging in casual conversation about him unless you are really calling him or, use our preparatory command sequence. Most people find our method easier.
Madison and Riley "Waiting for Spring!"

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Dave
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by Dave »

I'll have Jan join in . I believe Holly is fairly well trained on leash for come . It's the "turn off your ears period ", she's in right now . Holly has been to obedience class .

I think in this instance a good trainer that trains the proper use of an ecollar would be in Holly's best interest .She is very smart and probably has a high prey drive . Whistle training is good also , but an ecollar with a tone feature is better .

I would never use an ecollar on a Brittany that can be trained to solid recall without . Unfortunately Brittanys in many instances lose their ability to listen when that super nose takes over . Many believe they are cruel , but watching your dog running full tilt toward or down a busy street or highway and not listening just about stops my heart . I've know way too many that got hit and killed , or lost because of this . Those dogs in AZ awhile ago are a good example . :? 8)
If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.
-Will Rogers

LauraV
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by LauraV »

Dave wrote: Many believe they are cruel , but watching your dog running full tilt toward or down a busy street or highway and not listening just about stops my heart . I've know way too many that got hit and killed , or lost because of this . Those dogs in AZ awhile ago are a good example . :? 8)
EXACTLY!!!

My girl can sit, shake, roll over, play dead, do a flip, stay, wait, leave it, flip treats off her nose, etc (and if you have a cookie in your hand she will do all of the above in rapid fire mode :) ) but when she gets out to that field and spots a small animal, it's just go go go!
We rarely use the actual "continuous shock" button. It's probably 98% vibrate, 1.5% nick (short small shock) and 0.5% continuous shock.
This is the only way she can have freedom and do what she loves safely.

We also know that she can handle it. We have a second Brit who would lose it if we shocked him. We will never try the collar on him, and he will never have the freedom she has.
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swillow66
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Re: Holly settled in and acting like a pup

Post by swillow66 »

LOL, I had a nice reply typed yesterday but my computer lost it when I hit "send" :twisted: Urgh!
Dave wrote:I'll have Jan join in . I believe Holly is fairly well trained on leash for come . It's the "turn off your ears period ", she's in right now . Holly has been to obedience class .

I think in this instance a good trainer that trains the proper use of an ecollar would be in Holly's best interest .She is very smart and probably has a high prey drive . Whistle training is good also , but an ecollar with a tone feature is better .
Obedience class is the perfect place to start! :lol: :lol: While I think most instructors are very good, sometimes they don't understand how driven these Britts can be especially off leash! I truly think the above method is the best way to TRAIN for consistant off leash control. If the method is used consistently everyday you will soon have a reliable dog in any situation.
I would never use an ecollar on a Brittany that can be trained to solid recall without . Unfortunately Brittanys in many instances lose their ability to listen when that super nose takes over . Many believe they are cruel , but watching your dog running full tilt toward or down a busy street or highway and not listening just about stops my heart . I've know way too many that got hit and killed , or lost because of this . Those dogs in AZ awhile ago are a good example . :? 8)
There is nothing more scary than having dogs "in the zone" when it puts their lives in danger. I am not anti e-collar as I own them myself. I worry that they give owners a false sense of security as they are not 100% full-proof, especially since dogs do not wear them 24/7. It always seems that dogs "know" when these collars are off (these Britts are too darn smart :roll: :D ) and that is when they get into the most trouble.

Regardless of the method, I know that all of us agree until a dog learns recall the best and safest method is for them to simply be leashed unless in a secure area! :D Shelli
Madison and Riley "Waiting for Spring!"

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To the world you are just one person, but to one person you can mean the world

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