Dental Chews

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Cindy
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Dental Chews

Post by Cindy »

I just had Pippa at the vet and he said that she'd have to get her teeth cleaned pretty soon. He also suggested C.E.T. dental chews to see if that would help and gave me a sample, which the dogs loved! Just curious if anyone else uses these and what size you give. The website says large size for a Brittany but that seems a bit excessive. They look like rawhides and Layla and Pippa chew they pretty well. I gave Kayla a smaller one and she gnawed on it for a while and the next time I looked it was gone! I read somewhere they they are made of something that's more digestible than regular rawhides but not sure if that's really true. :roll: Is there something better to try (besides actually brushing their teeth!)?
Kayla RIP 10/2/15, Pippa, and Layla
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StFrost
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by StFrost »

We use them for our 17 year old, she is too old to put under for a teeth cleaning and since we have started, her breath is way better. We give her the small (under 11 pounds) but are moving up to medium next time.

Barb Wright
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Barb Wright »

Cindy wrote: Is there something better to try (besides actually brushing their teeth!)?
Raw bones, shank, knuckle, large rib bones. Or Bully sticks, the real thing (bull or other large animal penises or large tendons)....watch out for ringers. C.E.T. chews are just rawhide doctored up. If you read the process that animal hides go through you would not ever feed these to your dog!!! Whole Dog Journal has covered this subject often and to a thorough degree....I believe you can trust their research. Go to their web site (will need to register) and check out all the articles that cover this subject....enlightening!!!

VOE I never had to have Cassies' teeth cleaned until she was 12-13, and at that time it was mostly because I had had to stop giving her bones because of a slab fracture of a molar, and that tooth had to be removed finally. In fact, I never had to have the teeth cleaned of any of the 60 or so dogs I've owned.....they always had raw bones to gnaw, teeth were never an issue !!
RIP Sweet Cassie 4/98 - 3/13

Cindy
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Cindy »

I know that rawhides are not good and I've been giving the dogs raw bones for years, But I can't say that I've seen any difference in their teeth and tartar build up. Guess they are like people - some have better teeth than others. :) From what I've read (and I DON'T believe everything I read!) the CET chews are more highly digestible AND they also have some kind of enzymes (or something) that helps break down the tartar and keep them from getting more. It's whatever they put in the doggie toothpaste. I will try to access the Whole Dog Journal articles since I haven't seen them in my more general Google searches. Thanks.
Kayla RIP 10/2/15, Pippa, and Layla
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Lisa
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Lisa »

I've never used dental chews for dental care. My dogs love Greenies and so they get those as special treats on occasion, but not as a means of dental care. I buy a size smaller than recommended for their weight, mainly because the things are very high in calories.

For dental care, I use raw beef ribs with bones, smoked bones, raw femurs, etc. And, my dogs always have access to nylabones, which they chew quite a bit. Buster has a horrid bite, so he has dental issues in the form of worn teeth, but not much tartar build up. With Charm, I also use a dental scaler and scale her teeth lightly to remove tartar and stains before shows. The biggest issue with my guys is that they like to eat poop, which does cause staining and build up on the teeth.
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Cindy
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Cindy »

The biggest issue with my guys is that they like to eat poop, which does cause staining and build up on the teeth.
For real? My dogs have free range access to acres of horse pasture and therefore manure. I was always thankful that they chose to eat it rather than roll in it but maybe that's the problem with their teeth?? And YES, there are always a variety of nylabones around which they all chew on regularly.
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Lisa
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Lisa »

Yup! Poop eaters tend to have worse teeth than non-poop eaters.

Forgive the graphic-ness here...poop is usually kinda gooey and full of bacteria. So, it sticks to the teeth and that bacteria causes staining and plaque build-up, which turns in to tartar.
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Cindy
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Cindy »

Well that is certainly enlightening and defintely explains the problem with the dogs' teeth. I guess I could move the invisible fencing to keep them out of the pasture but that would really limit their exercise area to about an acre as opposed to 6 acres. I may just have to deal with the teeth and having them cleaned every few years.
Kayla RIP 10/2/15, Pippa, and Layla
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Barb Wright
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Barb Wright »

There is a big difference between the poop of a vegetarian (horses, cows, sheep, etc.), and a carnivore (dogs, cats, wolves, fox, etc.). You won't find a vegetarian eating carnivore poop, but you will find a carnivore eating both. So, I'd say that the reasons for carnivore poop causing tartar or plaque is rather complex. I think before I started moving IF or any other fences I would get a little more information about just WHY any variety of poop would be a cause of plaque or tartar. (I address this a little farther down). Bad breath temporarily, yep, but the body produces enzymes (and other "juices") that cleanse the mouth out fairly fast.....though with dogs so many of the digestive juices occur in the stomach that perhaps the ones that do occur in the mouth are just not strong or efficient enough to cleanse well and quickly enough. One of the WHY's....Carbs in a dogs' diet are highly culpable toward the formation of tartar and plaque....again, the mouth juices just do not cleanse away well the carb residue that clings to the teeth. (Actually, this is true of our own mouths as well.) That is why chewing/gnawing on bones helps so much with cleaning off "sticky" stuff on the teeth. There are other contributors to plaque, and eventually tartar, which are based in health issues, essentially digestive problems, followed by physical problems. If you feed a diet that contains grains, veggies, starches (all of which dogs do not digest well and for the most part are unnecessary in their diet) you will probably be faced with plaque and tartar buildups sooner or later.

Just some thoughts out there to consider.
RIP Sweet Cassie 4/98 - 3/13

Cindy
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by Cindy »

You are always such a fountain of information - Thanks! Dogs are fed TOTW which is grain free but I'm not sure about the amounts of veggies and sugars. Will have to read the label on the next bag. All of the dogs are big grazers (learned that from the horses :lol: ) so maybe grass doesn't help?
Kayla RIP 10/2/15, Pippa, and Layla
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adele
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Re: Dental Chews

Post by adele »

I wouldn't think the amount of grass they could get would make much difference. Mine are grasseaters too and considering the way it comes out :oops: I don't think it gets chewed up much - just chopped and swallowed. Lola's 9 and when she was recently under (so the vet could look at that huge lump on her neck) I asked the vet to clean the little bit of tartar that was appearing. The vet said she didn't think it was necessary but I figured.. if a little was there now by the time she was 12 or 13 it may add up and hopefully she'll never have to be sedated again... so I thought I'd do a little preventative maintenance.... but I keep her teeth clean by giving her raw bones and Tartar Busters... it has worked so far.

Tramp was a mess when I got him but his teeth were gleaming white. A year of finding his own food - I assume eating mice and birds - kept his teeth in excellent shape.
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