Does Frontline cause hair loss?

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Bernie's mom
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Does Frontline cause hair loss?

Post by Bernie's mom »

When Bernie was neutered about 2 months ago the vet, and I, noticed that one side of his muzzle was very sparse of hair, as well as a patch on his chest, and the inside of his lower front legs. He seemed to be itching a bit too. I had treated him with frontline that month and the month before. The vet put him on antibiotics and we finished those, but I'm wondering if it wasn't something bacterial and in fact a reaction from the frontline? I haven't treated him with it since...
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Myra
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Post by Myra »

I've used Frontline and Frontline Plus for years on many dogs and have never had a single problem.

Of course that doesn't mean it couldn't cause a problem like you describe. I could understand it causing hair loss at the point of application, but I'd be surprised if it caused hair loss at other locations.

Has any of the hair grown back since you stopped using Frontline, or has the itching been reduced?

About the itchiness--excessive scratching can cause hair loss, as can excessive licking of the legs (since dogs can't scratch their legs, they tend to lick them). Before we got Dusty's allergies under control he was close to bald on his chest and neck due to all the scratching, and on his legs due to licking.

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Post by Janice »

I'm not sure that hair loss would be caused by this, but I've heard of irritations on the site of the application. I don't know if you are dealing with ticks up in your area, but I try not to give my dogs any flea/tick appications unless absolutely necessary. When I first got my two dogs from rescue they were very prone to fleas and ticks. With some good food and vitamins, I rarely need to apply Frontline anymore. One of my dogs has not had it in over a year and the other one I've had to apply it for the past two years only at the beginning of summer for one month. Here in Florida we tend to get our fair share of fleas and ticks.

I'd try not applying it and see if the problem goes away. You may not even need it for fleas and ticks as much as you might think.
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Post by Karen_P »

That's a very good point. I know the instructions say to apply once a month, but one application works against fleas for 3 months (only 1 month for ticks).

I know I only apply once or twice a year, and I'm not even sure if I have to do that...I've never seen a flea on either of mine. Just always afraid a foster will bring "guests".

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Post by Janice »

I wouldn't even bother to apply it once or twice a year. If you see a couple of fleas, flea comb them out. If you see fleas on a regular basis, I'd probably just apply it then.

Blue, who has not had a Frontline treatment in over a year had two ticks on him a couple of months ago, I just pulled them off and watched for more, but they never appeared so he didn't get a treatment.

Lets face it, there are warnings on those packages not to get it on yourself, so it can't be all that healthy for the dogs. I'm a believer that treatments such as these are toxic to the point of eventually causing cancer and other diseases in the dogs. Why risk it. If you have a vet who has been priacticing for twenty years or so, ask them if they see more cancer now than they did twenty years ago. My vet thinks the incidence of cancer has more than doubled. So please think about using this stuff sparingly.
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Post by Bernie's mom »

I agree about how toxic the stuff is. He hasn't gotten a treatment in almost 3 months now, and I don't think he'll need one until next summer... does that stuff keep, or will it go bad over the winter from sitting in a drawer? I don't think I'll use it anymore, unless like you said, I see fleas or lots of ticks... anyone know of an all natural way to prevent fleas?
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Karen_P
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Post by Karen_P »

Garlic

Dave
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Post by Dave »

Yes Garlic , you never know when there is an Italian Britt in the mix :wink: Kidding of course , couldn't help putting in the pun . Garlic also works very good to keep off mosquitos . :P

Bernie's mom
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Post by Bernie's mom »

How? Does he have to eat it, or do I buy garlic pills and squeeze the oil on him? hmm... I like garlic...
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Barb Wright
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Post by Barb Wright »

Chop up a garlic clove and put it in the dogs food.....that way you will be able to keep all your friends and neighbors who like to stop by for a visit :wink:

Seriously, the dog will be less attractive to the mini vampires because of the odor.....noooooo, you will not be able to smell it on him, but the monsters will, and will look for a more "pleasureable" creature to dine on :)

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Post by youjach »

how often would you give it to the dogs-

Once a day everyday for the whole summer?

We do use Frontline Plus from April until October twice during this time but I am always telling my kids and company not to touch the dog for at least a day. I would love to switch to garlic.

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Post by Karen_P »

I'm sure Barb can be more specific, but there are many benefits to giving your dogs garlic that reach beyond pest control, just as garlic is good for people.

If you're going to do it, I'd suggest giving it to them all year round.

Barb Wright
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Post by Barb Wright »

Well, since you asked :twisted: .......(this is from our old MB archives)

Garlic......has many medicinal benefits and activities. It is antibacterial, stimulates the immune system, is antioxidant, antiviral, antifungal, antimicrobial, and a cardiovascular and blood tonic. These are the primary medicinal activities...it has other health benefits as well. It contains considerable amounts of protein, fiber, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin A, some of the B vitamins, and dozens of other nutritive compounds. It has earned a reputation (backed up by scientific studies) as "Mother Natures' antibiotic", as it works in much the same way as a synthetic antibiotic, but does not harm the beneficial flora in the digestive tract.....

Now, to useage...as with all medicinal herbs, and especially in the case of feeding dogs/cats, this is an herb that is best used in moderation, more is not better and proper dosages/amounts should be adhered to. Excessive and/or continuous (daily) use can cause health problems as garlic also acts as a blood thinner. With dogs being such individual beings (as are we) and not knowing the exact pshysiological status at any given time without a blood test, it is wise to lean to the conservative side and thus intermittant use is suggested, such as: one minced clove mixed in food every 2-3 days for two weeks. Then none for 1-2 weeks, then back on the garlic again, and so on. This is a very cautious schedule and should cause absolutely no problem, but will still achieve all or most of the miraculous benefits. I recommend fresh garlic rather than powdered for two reasons: first, so many of the powdered forms have salt and anticaking chemicals added, this you absolutely do not want; and second, having been dried and much abused in the manufacturing process the garlic has lost a great deal of its' healing properties.....fresh is the way to go :!:

Some animals will tolerate larger more frequent amounts, others should have less...you should begin slowly introducing it (or any medicinal herb) and watch for contraindications. Let me stress here, herbs are beneficial and benign, given in proper amounts. Moderation is a cardinal rule in herb useage.

Maybe more than you wanted to know....... :lol:

Barb Wright
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Post by Barb Wright »

And back to the original subject, hair loss.....try adding an EFA (essential fatty acid) to the daily diet. A capsule of salmon or cod oil, a tablespoon of cold pressed flaxseed or olive oil, or purchase from the health food store a combo EFA supplment. If the hair loss is caused by this deficiency you will see fairly rapid improvement, say in 2-3 weeks (that IS rapid for nutritional healing :-))))

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Post by MrsK »

We switched over to Intercept.

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