alternative to Interceptor?

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MaggieRocks
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alternative to Interceptor?

Post by MaggieRocks »

Just wondering what everyone is using as a heartworm preventative. I bought a 1 year supply of Interceptor for each dog last year, so I am good for another 2 months. But come September...what to use, now that Interceptor has become nearly impossible to find?

I had Maggie at the vet last week for her checkup, and the vet suggested Trifexis. Before Interceptor, we used Heartgard for the girls. Any suggestions on something safe and effective that doesn't cost an arm and a leg?

Barb Wright
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Re: alternative to Interceptor?

Post by Barb Wright »

DO NOT use Trifexis......there have been many adverse events connected with this preventative.

Preventing heartworm sounds like a wonderful magic answer, but a truly healthy dog with a good optimum functioning immune system can RESIST heartworm, and for that matter many dogs with heartworm die WITH heartworm, not FROM it!! Put your mind to it, how did dogs survive these parasites all these thousands of years without big Pharma??? I can tell you exactly how....a healthy immune system that has not been compromised and blocked by chemicals and vaccinations that suppress the immune system. Yes, I know, this is a different drum to march to......but the most important thing you can do for any dog is to support their natural immunity to all the demons out there. That means no vaccinations (beyond the initial puppy vaccs for Parvo and Distemper, one rabies vacc), no preventatives, a diet that is species appropriate (meat, fat, bone, offals, a little bit of vegetation, NOT grain and fillers and artificial ingredients that rarely even qualify as food), avoiding as many chemicals as possible (cleaning, pesticides, insecticides, too many environmental pollutants to mention), clean water and lots of exercise.

It is thinking outside the box and most of you will say BS and delete. But I walk the walk, and from personal experience know that drugs only cover symptoms, poison the body with lots of collateral damage, and ultimately do not cure. Yes, we have poisons that get rid of the parasites, and if this can be done with BRIEF exposure, well, go for it. But monthly, yearly, constant assault with poisons does more harm (collateral damage to liver, heart, kidneys, thyroid, brain, the entire nervous and endocrine system, muscles) than the parasites would ever create. Preventatives are taking the easy, and yes, less expensive money-wise way out. But what about the cost to the body?? If you live in an area that has a prevalent parasite problem then stool and titer testing every six months will keep you up to date on the status of your dog’s parasite situation. It’s more expensive, but in the long run you don’t have a dog constantly fighting poison. The cost of this constant assault of poison is evident in a multitude of physical issues....seizures, arthritis, eye and ear issues, heart problems, digestive problems, many physiological and behavior issues, the list is HUGE.

Well, anyway, with that little rant off my chest, there are herbal approaches that go a long way toward "preventing" parasite infestation, raw garlic being the first that comes to mind. But most of all, the BEST defense is a strong and unsupressed immune system. That's how it has been done for thousands and thousands of years!
RIP Sweet Cassie 4/98 - 3/13

janjan1
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Re: alternative to Interceptor?

Post by janjan1 »

Interceptor may be one of the options for my demodex boy but even if we decide to try it we likely can't get it.
Maybe there is a stockpile out there.......

mkilcz
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Re: alternative to Interceptor?

Post by mkilcz »

I just ran out of Interceptor, and the vet recommended Iverhart Plus. I don't know much about it, but it was less expensive than the Interceptor, and there is a picture of a Brittany on the box. Hopefully a good sign, lol.
Image

Marge

janet909
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Re: alternative to Interceptor?

Post by janet909 »

I've used Iverhart for years for my three. It's cheaper and with 3 dogs.......... :oops: I went for the lower cost. We have TONS of mosquitos here, especially since we live on a river. I used to use Heartguard but when my vet suggested Iverhart for it's cost, I went with it. In western Colorado, we give it for 9 months, March through November with a 3 month winter break.

janjan1
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Re: alternative to Interceptor?

Post by janjan1 »

Iverhart-must have ivermectin in it?

Barb Wright
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Re: alternative to Interceptor?

Post by Barb Wright »

janjan1 wrote:Iverhart-must have ivermectin in it?
Yes, and some other de-wormers as well.

From the MSDS: Emergency Overview (Ivermectin)
WARNING!
Hazardous to humans.
May cause adverse gastrointestinal, liver and central nervous system effects.
Wash thoroughly with soap and water after handling.
Keep out of reach of children.

But it is okay for dogs???

FYI: Adverse Reactions (Iverhart)

Self-limiting adverse reactions including lethargy, limpness, salivation, shaking, diarrhea, decreased appetite, licking lips, and belching were reported between 20 minutes and 72 hours following treatment in a field study with Iverhart Max Chewable Tablets. In clinical field trials with ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed (1.1% of administered doses). The following adverse reactions have been reported following the use of ivermectin: depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation.

MO once again: Never give any drug to your dog without reading the Client Information Sheet....there should be one with every drug dispensed whether by you or by your vet.
RIP Sweet Cassie 4/98 - 3/13

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